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Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (NSIP)

The Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (NSIP) process deals with the granting of development consent for large-scale projects, such as:

  • major new transport, utilities and energy infrastructure
  • large-scale business and commercial developments

Development Consent Orders (DCOs) are a form of planning permission that can integrate other types of approval, such as highways / infrastructure works and Compulsory Purchase Orders (CPO).

NSIP applications are examined by The Planning Inspectorate (PINS) through independent examination, a form of public inquiry, rather than by the Council as the Local Planning Authority. The project developers are nevertheless required to carry out extensive pre-application public consultation prior to submitting their application direct to PINS.  After examining an application the Planning Inspectorate makes a report and recommendation on the project to the Secretary of State (usually for Transport) who then decides whether to grant or refuse development consent.

Further information on the NSIP process can be found at National Infrastructure Planning (hosted by The Planning Inspectorate)

Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects in South Tyneside

A19/A184 Testo's Junction Alteration 

Highways England (formerly known as the Highways Agency, and responsible for motorways and strategic trunk roads across the country) has obtained a Development Consent Order for the grade-separation A19(T) flyover for the Testo's roundabout and associated works. It is aimed at helping to relieve congestion and improve road safety at the junction while minimising environmental impacts. 

You can find out more about this Development Consent Order at National Infrastructure Planning - A19/A184 Testo's Junction Alteration.

A19/A1290 Downhill Lane Junction Improvements

Highways England is proposing to make major improvements to the A19/A1290 Downhill Lane interchange in South Tyneside. 

For Highways England proposals information, go to Highways England - A19 Downhill Lane Junction Improvement.

To view examination information, go to National Infrastructure Planning - A19 Downhill Lane Junction Improvement.

International Advanced Manufacturing Park (IAMP) - Phase Two

The Sunderland and South Tyneside City Deal includes a vision to develop an International Advanced Manufacturing Park (IAMP) on land to the north of the Nissan car manufacturing plant alongside the A19(T). 

Phase Two (also known as IAMP Two) will need to be subject to a NSIP Development Consent Order application. For information, Phase One (and which is entirely located in Sunderland) has been already subject to a planning application.

To visit the IAMP website, go to International Advanced Manufacturing Park (IAMP).

To view examination information, go to The Planning Inspectorate - International Advanced Manufacturing Park.

What does NSIP designation mean for Planning Applications?

The Government's direction under Section 35 of the Planning Act 2008 means that any planning application for that particular development project must now go through the Government's Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project (NSIP) development consent order (DCO) process.

The NSIP consenting process brings together planning, land assembly, environmental and access matters for a proposed project within a single consultation, application, public examination and decision making process, determined by the Secretary of State.  If successful, this would result in a development consent order, which would contain all permissions, powers and consents necessary to enable the project to proceed.

The S35 direction also means that the Council (as the Local Planning Authority) must refer any planning application or proposed application for development falling within the scope of the Secretary of State's direction to the Secretary of State instead of dealing with it themselves. The Council will therefore be unable to validate planning applications made for any element of such development under the usual Town and Country Planning Act 1990 procedures. 

Landowners, developers or their agents seeking to engage in pre-application discussions relating to any development within the Section 35 boundary are therefore advised to contact the Council before proceeding.  We will then take a decision with our legal advisors on whether the proposal should be referred to the Secretary of State.

Any application made for a development consent order must comply with Chapter 2 of Part 5 (pre-application procedure) of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended) and be of a standard that the Secretary of State finds satisfactory.

It is an offence to carry out development for which development consent is required at a time when no development consent is in force in respect of that development.

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