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Electrical recycling

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How to recycle your home electrical appliances:


Small electrical appliances

You can recycle small electrical appliances that are broken or unwanted such as kettles, irons, electronic toys, phones, remote controls, toasters, radios, hairdryers etc. in the main part of your blue recycling bin. If it is in good working order you can donate to a local charity or pass it onto someone who could use it.

  • You can recycle small electrical appliances in your blue bin
  • If you have a number of electrical then a 'pink bank' at different locations across South Tyneside can be used to recycle many items  recycling site

Large electrical appliances 

Large appliances such as washing machines, dryers, cookers, microwaves, heaters, radiators etc.

Light bulbs

  • Fluorescent tubes and energy saving bulbs can be recycled at the Recycling Village (please do not break the tubes / bulbs). We remove the hazardous mercury for reuse or treatment. The metal and plastic is then recycled.

Batteries

  • Household batteries are accepted at the Recycling Village
  • Most large retailers also have facilities for recycling batteries

What happens to the recycled items?

Old products will be broken down and have their component parts separated, such as metals and plastics, so they can be recycled to create new products.

Some items may contain substances that are harmful to a person's health when the product is broken down. The treatment and process makes the product safe before it is recycled such as removing batteries and hazardous substances.

Did you know? 

Around 1 million tonnes of small electrical items are thrown away in the UK every year. That's the same weight as 21 ships the size of the Titanic.  

Please remember

If your electrical item can still be used, have you considered giving it to friends or family or selling it?

Reusing items instead of recycling or throwing them away is better for the environment.


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